Doberman

  • Doberman
  • Beagle
  • Beagle

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Weight: Male: 34–45 kg, Female: 27–41 kg
Height: Male: 66–72 cm, Female: 61–68 cm
Colors: White, Black, Fawn, Blue, Red, Black & Rust, Red & Rust, Blue & Rust, Fawn & Rust
Life span: 10 – 13 years

Individual personalities of Doberman Pinschers are varied. Some are outgoing and friendly, others are shy and reserved. Some are dominant with other dogs and chase cats and small dogs, while others are social butterflies at the dog park and have been known to cuddle up with kittens for long naps. Regardless of the individual, all Dobermans are steadfast and loyal companions, true friends to the people they love. They are fearless in the face of danger and make excellent guard dogs, but contrary to popular opinion, they are not attack dogs. Their method of protection is to keep intruders at bay, pinning them to a wall or corner until backup arrives. Despite their reputation for viciousness, most Pinschers are big softies at heart who love the companionship of people.

The Doberman's lifespan is about 10–11 years, on average. They may suffer from a number of health concerns. Common serious health problems include dilated cardiomyopathy, cervical vertebral instability (CVI), von Willebrand's disease (a bleeding disorder for which genetic testing has been available since 2000; the test enables both parents of a prospective litter to be tested for the carrier gene, thus preventing inheritance of the disease ), and prostatic disease. Less serious common health concerns include hypothyroidism and hip dysplasia. Canine compulsive disorder is also common. Studies have shown that the Doberman Pinscher suffers from prostatic diseases, (such as bacterial prostatiti, prostatic cysts, prostatic adenocarcinoma, and benign hyperplasia) more than any other breed. Neutering can significantly reduce these risks (see Dog for information).

Dilated cardiomyopathy is a major cause of death in Doberman Pinschers. This disease affects Dobermans more than any other breed. Nearly 40% of DCM diagnoses are for Doberman Pinschers, followed by German Shepherds at 13%. Research has shown that the breed is affected by an attenuated wavy fiber type of DCM that affects many other breeds, as well as an additional, fatty infiltration-degenerative type that appears to be specific to Doberman Pinscher and Boxer breeds. This serious disease is likely to be fatal in most Doberman Pinschers affected.

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